Archive for the ‘Blog’ Category

The Value of Therapy at Times of Change

April 6th, 2019

Dywane Wade will soon be wrapping up an illustrious 15-year NBA career. He will retire as a three-time NBA champion and 13-time NBA All-Star. As a player, I will remember him for making hard things look easy, getting up after getting knocked down, and stepping up in big moments. Recently, Dywane made news by announcing he will go to therapy to help his transition into retirement. Kudos to Dywane for recognizing the enormity of the change he faces, and more importantly, for displaying the courage

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Pain and the Brain

April 5th, 2019

We have all experienced pain. Usually our pain is short-lived. When pain is prolonged, it can affect our mood, relationships, and outlook. In the 1960s, Ronald Melzack and Patrick Wall introduced the gate control theory, which is a theory of pain and pain management. Melzack and Wall proposed that a gate exists between where the pain is occurring in the body and where the pain is processed in the brain. While certain activities, thoughts, and emotions open the gate (intensify pain), other experiences close the

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My Inner Game of Golf Experience

June 12th, 2018

I love to golf. I enjoy being outside in warm weather and spending 3-4 hours with my son or friends. I also think there are few things as fulfilling as hitting a solid shot. Last month, I had the good fortune and pleasure of playing two major championship golf courses with long-time friends. In anticipation of this once-in-a-lifetime experience, I set out to get my golf game in top shape. This included spending time at indoor golf simulators in the late winter and early spring.

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Bell Let’s Talk Day

January 31st, 2018

Today is Bell Let’s Talk Day. Wondering how you can support this cause? 5 cents will be donated to mental health initiatives for: every text message and call made through Bell Canada, every tweet using #BellLetsTalk, and every view on Bell Let’s Talk video on both Facebook and Instagram. One in five Canadians will experience a mental illness in their lifetime. Unfortunately, the stigma of mental illness is a leading reason why two-thirds of those living with a mental illness do not seek help. Bell Let’s

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Beating the Winter Blues

January 25th, 2018

We are in the thick of winter.  The holidays seem long ago, and spring feels out of reach. The winter blues are not uncommon. In more severe cases, winter blues are a form of depression. Along with typical depressive symptoms (such as worthlessness and loss of interest in most activities), seasonal depression is often characterized by overeating, tiredness, and weight gain. Consider making one of these small lifestyle changes to improve your spirits: Help someone (big or small) Seek out a fun winter activity Go

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Einstein’s Thoughts on Happiness

October 26th, 2017

At an auction this week, a handwritten note by Albert Einstein on happiness sold for $1.5 million. It was said that, 95 years ago, Einstein gave the happiness note to a bellboy or messenger instead of offering a tip. Einstein’s message: “A calm and modest life brings more happiness than the pursuit of success combined with constant restlessness.” Einstein’s genius had no limits.

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Exercise and Mental Health: Get Moving

October 27th, 2016

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of speaking at the University of Guelph as part of a symposium organized by Exercise is Medicine Canada at Guelph.  The other guest speakers (Dr. Geoffrey Power and Dr. Dan Vitale) were informative and engaging. The audience was attentive and seemed ready to learn and be inspired. Recent clinical research supports what many of us already know… exercise is good for your mental health.  Studies show that exercise helps with mood and improves quality of life.  Exercise (even low level

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Group Therapy for Teenage Anxiety

June 15th, 2016

Think back to your teens. You likely have many fond memories – times with friends, first job, learning to drive, or graduating.   You also likely have memories of more difficult times – break ups, failed tests, or times of self-doubt. Our teenage years are a time of change, challenge, and opportunity. Sometimes the changes, challenges, and opportunities are well-handled and our confidence is strengthened. Other times, the weight of adolescence feels like too much and we start to feel anxious. Anxiety comes in many

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Preventing Summertime Anxiety

June 13th, 2016

With summer just around the corner, many of us will have a long awaited break from work and school. However, having too much unscheduled time leads some of us to feel anxious. To help reduce this anxiety, maintain some school-like structure to your life during the summer. For younger children, set regular play dates or sign up for day camp programs. For teens, find a part-time job or volunteer. For adults, catch up on self-care by scheduling days off work to catch a baseball game

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The Breath: The Body’s Natural Calming Device

May 24th, 2016

Have you noticed your breathing today? Your breathing can tell you a lot about your state of mind. Are you calm? Nervous? Stressed? Checking into your breathing helps bring you back to the present and makes you more aware of what is currently going on in your life.  Proper breathing has even been linked to better mental and physical health (e.g., reduced anxiety and lower blood pressure). Here are some quick exercises you can use to get in touch with your breathing: 1)      Place your

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Did you know…

One in five Canadians will experience a mental illness in their lifetime.

 

A psychologist can help.

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